19th Century Opera

 Read “Introduction: Romanticism and Realism” and “19th Century Opera and Ballet” 
Answer Question #1 (3 points)
Answer TWO OTHER Questions from below (1.25 point each)

Question 1.
Read the information on “Wolf’s Glen Scene” from Carl von Weber’s opera Der Freischutz (The Freeshooter) in “19th Century Opera and Ballet, linked above. 
Describe why the scene is especially significant in as an early example of Romanticism in 19th-century opera. (Remember that Romanticism refers to the aesthetic movement, not to the everyday meaning of “romantic”.) In your answer, consider all of the following elements in the scene: 

How Weber employs the various instruments in the orchestra
The effect of the background chorus of men’s and women’s voices
The stage setting (scenery, lighting)
How the sing/actors in the scene use spoken/sung vocal delivery
The conversation that transpires between the two characters in the scene

ANSWER ANY TWO OF THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS –
Number your answer according to the question number.
Question 2. Read the section on Richard Wagner’s operas 19th-century opera. View the videos of Wagner’s operas The Valkyrie and The Flying Dutchman that are linked there.
Wagner’s composed operas as the height of the Romantic movement. Two of the most well known are The Valkyrie and The Flying Dutchman. For each opera, why is it considered to be representative of the Romantic movement? (Different reason for each opera. One sentence each.)
Question 3. Read the sections on Georges Bizet’s  Carmen and Giacomo Puccini’s La Bohème i n 19th-century opera, and view the video linked there. For each opera, why is it a considered to be representative of Realism? (Different reason for each opera. One sentence each.)
Question 4. Read the sections on Giacomo Rossini and Giuseppe Verdi in 19th-century opera, and view the videos linked there. In two sentences, compare the scenes from The Barber of Seville and Nebucco.