Describe one of the most serious flaws in this study and why it leaves you wondering if the study findings should be used as evidence in an assessment of patient handoff?

Common Flaws in Quantitative StudiesWhen nurses have a question about a clinical practice issue that they can turn to the literature to see what scientific evidence is available that addresses their question. However, as discussed in Week 2, not all evidence is created equal. When looking at the literature, it is important to evaluate each research study. Before assumptions can be made about the applicability of a study’s results, specific elements of a research design must be evaluated.
This week, you will examine elements of the strength of a quantitative research study’s design, including sample size, generalizability, statistical analysis and conclusions. Keep in mind all studies have flaws or are not valid for your population. Consequently, one study by itself will not warrant a change in practice. It is important to find a number of studies to support your change in practice.
To Prepare for this Discussion
Review the following from this week’s resources:
Discussion Rubric, provided in the Course Information areaThis week’s Writing ResourcesThis week’s articles and mediaBy Day 3Post the following:
After viewing the Week 3 Webinar: Critical Appraisal of Quantitative Research, review the Appraisal Guide: Findings of a Quantitative Study in this week’s resources. Of the questions discussed on the second page of the critique form, titled Credibility, which ones were identified in the article reviewed during the webinar? Describe one of the most serious flaws in this study and why it leaves you wondering if the study findings should be used as evidence in an assessment of patient handoff?
Note Initial Post: A three-paragraph (at least 350 words) response. Be sure to use evidence from the readings and include in-text citations. Utilize essay-level writing practice and skills, including the use of transitional material and organizational frames. Avoid quotes; paraphrase to incorporate evidence into your own writing. A reference list is required. Use the most current evidence (usually ≤ 5-years-old.)
Brown, S. J. (2018). Evidence-based nursing: The research-practice connection (4th ed.). Jones & Bartlett Learning.
Chapter 13, “Appraising Research Evidence” (pp. 265–274)Chapter 14, “Appraising Recommendations of Clinical Practice Guidelines” (pp. 275–281)Chapter 16, “Appraising Findings of Original Studies” (pp. 289–300)