In Plato’s Apology, Socrates famously observes that “the unexamined life is not worth living” (Plato 38a). Explain and evaluate how Socrates argues for this thesis.

Essay 1: Assignment requirements In an essay approximately 5 pages in length, double-spaced, 12-point Times New Roman font, answer one (and only one) of the following questions: 1. In Plato’s Apology, Socrates famously observes that “the unexamined life is not worth living” (Plato 38a). Explain and evaluate how Socrates argues for this thesis. Your analysis should begin by looking at (i) Socrates’s discussion of the Oracle of Delphi and Socratic ignorance; (ii) his presentation of philosophy as a heroic quest; and (iii) his comments on the “care of the self” and his role as “gadfly” in spurring individuals and communities alike to focus on what is most important to a life lived well. Then, present what you take to be the 2-3 most cogent objections to the view you just laid out. Finally, evaluate the debate in light of the objections raised—does Socrates succeed in defending the view that philosophy/the examined life is the best type of life to lead? 2. Using the arguments developed by Thrasymachus, Glaucon, or Adeimantus in Plato’s Republic, present what you take to be the strongest case for moral skepticism. You may focus on just one interlocutor or you may mix and match their various arguments to create the overall strongest position—but limit yourself to 3 main arguments (i.e. 3 main points). Then, present what you take to be the 2-3 most important objections to the view you just laid out. Finally, evaluate the debate in light of the objections you raised—can the case for moral skepticism withstand these objections? Or should we modify it? Or do the objections prove to be insuperable obstacles to embracing moral skepticism? Note: Glaucon’s 3 types of “good” (357c-358a) do not constitute an “argument” in their own right, but the distinction he draws can be used to set up one or more arguments in support of moral skepticism. 3. Based on the excerpts we read from Zhuangzi, develop what you take to be the strongest case for embracing Daoism. The case you make should consist of three main steps or arguments, including (i) a discussion of how, in the Glossary, Brook Ziporyn distinguishes Daoist from pre- Daoist conceptions of “Dao”; and (ii) one argument taken from Chapters 1-7 and another argument taken from a different chapter (thus, you need to discuss two different chapters). Then, present what you take to be the 2-3 most important objections to the view you just laid out. Finally, evaluate the debate in light of the objections you raised—does Daoism constitute a defensible philosophical way of life today? 2 Further requirements & tips Organization 1 intro ¶: keep the intro paragraph short; include a THESIS to serve as a roadmap to your paper. At a minimum, your thesis should state what specific arguments you’ll consider, but it should also state what conclusion you will reach at the end of your paper. You may not know that until you finish your paper—but that’s ok, just make sure to go back and include it in your intro. 3 pages: Lay out the main position 1 page: present 2-3 objections 1/2 page: assess the main position in light of the objections adduced Page numbers Include page numbers in your essay. Using Word, just click , then , then , then check the box for Citing sources It is essential that you always cite your sources. When citing required course readings, use a shorthand way of referencing the text—for example, by citing author and page number in-text, like this (Plato 43e). This is a convenient way to avoid crowding your essay with endnotes, while still providing clear source citation. When citing sources other than required course readings, use ENDNOTES formatted according to the Chicago Manual of Style. Endnotes are just like footnotes—except they appear at the end of your document. Microsoft Word allows you to create endnotes by clicking “references” tab, then selecting “insert endnote.” When you create your first endnote, highlight it; click “footnotes” tab; and select traditional Arabic (1, 2, 3) numerals rather than the default Roman numerals (i, ii, iii). If you do not have ready access to Word (and the complete Microsoft Office suite), you can install Microsoft Office on your laptop or desktop computer using the free edition FSCJ provides you as a student. For a quick guide to the Chicago Style, click here: https://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide/citation-guide-1.html