What are adverse effects of vaccinations on children/adolescents?

Pick a topic that is realistic. Realistic means that the topic has a clear impact/interaction. Topics such as how vaccine cause autism, for instance, is not realistic (the study has been debunked scientifically). However, the topic on how the science of vaccine should inform the public, is.
Make sure that there are primary literatures on the subject. Primary literature means that it is a research paper and NOT a review. The focus of writing a review is to consolidate many primary literatures on the subject. You will need 10 primary literature from peer-reviewed journals. These papers must be recent (published within the past 5 years).
Pick a paper from a reputable journal. In science we rely on peer reviewed articles. Peer reviewed means that the article has been subjected to appropriate scientific rigor in which other people have seen/reviewed the paper to avoid any scientific bias.

Step 3: Writing the paper

The anatomy of a review paper:

Introduction: This is where you want to frame the problem, use review articles to help you write this section. DO NOT PLAGIARIZE!

Why is this topic important?
What is currently known about the matter?

Body: This is where your primary literature search comes into play.

What has science done to show.? Or
How many research groups are studying the matter?

Conclusion: This is where you answer questions such as

Can anything be done to solve ..?
What are the improvement that can be implemented to .?

What are the potential pitfalls of this particular government policy to.?

Citations (please see Citation style for formatting): this is where you list your sources. List of things that are allowed to use as citation:

Primary research paper: look for these in PubMed. Your library has access to these paper through the library website. You can even get these papers through interlibrary loan.
Scientific databases: high throughput studies in science often times result in the creation of database. For instance: https://www.cbioportal.org/ (Links to an external site.) is a database designed by a consortium of researchers so that they can share their studies on cancer genome. Another website such as https://microbiomedb.org/mbio/app/ (Links to an external site.) will tell you all about the microbiome that youre interested in

Government websites: websites such as https://www.fda.gov/home (Links to an external site.) will help you with what guidelines the government has with regards to your topic.

Wikipedia: DO NOT cite Wikipedia. However, you can use the sources such as:

Wiki entry:
Cancer is a group of diseases involving abnormal cell growth with the potential to invade or spread to other parts of the body.[2][8] These contrast with benign tumors, which do not spread.[8] Possible signs and symptoms include a lump, abnormal bleeding, prolonged cough, unexplained weight loss, and a change in bowel movements.[1] While these symptoms may indicate cancer, they can also have other causes.[1] Over 100 types of cancers affect humans.[8]
Citation:

“Cancer Signs and symptoms” (Links to an external site.). NHS Choices. Archived (Links to an external site.) from the original on 8 June 2014. Retrieved 10 June2014.
“Cancer” (Links to an external site.). World Health Organization. 12 September 2018. Retrieved 19 December 2018.
Other considerations:

Writing style: When writing a scientific document, you must NOT use a personal pronoun. Remember this is a formal document

Incorrect:
I read a paper that examined the effects of grain-free diet on the health of dogs. The paper said that dogs fed grain-free diet had a higher chance of contracting cardiomyelopathy.
Correct:
Examination into the correlation between grain-free diet and the probabilities of cardiomyelopathy concluded that the two variables were highly correlated. [1]

Citation style: Follow Vancouver style of citation. Essentially, the first paper you cite is the first paper you put in your References section. You do NOT need to put the authors names alphabetically.

Example:
Human breast cancer metastasis is a complex multistep process that involves detachment of tumor cells from the original site, intravasation into the blood vessel, extravasation out of the blood vessel, and, finally, colonization of distant organs such as the bone, brain, lung, and liver [1-3]. Often times, it is not the primary tumor but the distant organ metastases that are the cause of patient mortality from breast cancer. Hence studies aimed at elucidating the signaling pathways that underlie the metastatic processes are warranted.
 
One of the complicating factors in studying the signaling pathways that underlie biological processes of human breast cancer is the heterogeneity of the disease. This is evident from the variety of genetic pathways that are involved in tumor development and progression. The genetic bases of the biology of breast cancer include both somatic genetic aberrations and epigenetic events [4]. 
References

Nguyen, D., Bos, P. D., and Massague, J. (2009). Metastasis: from dissemination to organ-specific colonization. Nature Reviews Cancer 9: 275 284.
Steeg, P. S. (2002). Metastasis suppressors alter the signal transduction of cancer cells. Nature Reviews Cancer 3: 55 63.
Weigelt, B., Peterse, J. L., and vant Veer L. J. (2005). Breast cancer metastasis: markers and models. Nature Reviews Cancer 5: 591 602.
Ponder, B. A. J. (2001). Cancer genetics. Nature 411: 336 341.

 

Citation programs: If you would like to use citation programs to help you with citation, here are the following programs you can use:

https://www.mendeley.com/ (Links to an external site.)
https://www.latex-project.org/ (Links to an external site.)

 

You MUST HAVE PRIMARY, PEER REVIEWED ARTICLES CITED IN YOUR PAPER. You may have NO Wikipedia resources! If you use multiple pages from a single website, it is still considered just one website-one source. When you access journals from the library through the internet, these are considered NON-WEB resources because they are simply electronic versions of hard copy papers that have been published in paper form elsewhere. Most libraries now store journal articles in electronic form. A web resource, is a website that does not exist in a published, printed format anywhere. If you access an electronic copy from a library database, treat it as a journal do not put any info on what database you accessed it from.