What aspect or aspects of your paper, in your opinion, were strongest?

Part I: Review and Revise
Look over either one of the Response Papers you’ve submitted so far in the course. Review your work and the professor’s grade feedback.
What did you do well? What aspect or aspects of your paper, in your opinion, were strongest?
What doesn’t work in your paper, and needs improvement? Or, what could you improve on further– even if this aspect was mostly adequate in your earlier paper?
Part II: Topic and thesis
Keeping what you’ve learned in the above exercise in mind, start to brainstorm a topic for the final research paper. Make sure to review the guidelines for the final research paper as well as the “Topic Development” Online Learning Resource from this week.
1. First, base your choice of texts on one of the following options:
A topic focusing on multiple texts (but no more than 2) by different authors. At least one of these texts must come from class-assigned literature.
A topic focusing on multiple texts (but no more than 3) by the same author. At least one of these texts must come from class-assigned literature.
2. Then, using the method outlined in the “Topic Development” document in this week’s Online Learning Resources, show what you plan to write about. Make sure to include:
Topic and Literary Theory (the author[s] and works you plan on writing about, and the theory you plan to apply to the literature you’ve chosen)
Research Question (the basic question that interests you about this topic, or the question your thesis intends to answer or address)
Working Thesis Statement (the one-sentence, declarative statement that announces the purpose of your eventual research paper)