What is a linguistics paper like, and what makes a good one?

Instructions:The essay should be a linguistic descriiption of a language other than English. At a minimum, it should cover the levels of phonology and morphosyntax. If you are a native speaker of that language, you are welcome to write about it.
The essay should be a linguistic descriiption of a language other than English. At a minimum, it should cover the levels of phonology and morphosyntax. If you are a native speaker of that language, you are welcome to write about it.The terminologies are in accordance with IPA(International Phonetic AlphabetThe detailed structure is in another file I uploaded named “Detailed Structure”References: For the empirical option, 7 would be good.For the other type: 10 or more
How to write a linguistics essay
Students in this class will not usually be familiar with the conventions used in linguistics papers. The purpose of this little document is to furnish you with some guidelines.
What is a linguistics paper like, and what makes a good one?The papers for this course are essentially of two types.
One type is basically empirical: you collect data and try to make sense of it. For example, you may collect data on word formation in a particular language. A good paper of this type will show that you can apply the things you are reading about, and are being taught, to linguistic analysis. Such a paper will probably only use a small number of references, say three or four, especially if you are in a position to collect data for yourself (if you are a native speaker of the language, or have access to informants, for example). The more you can show that you have figured out significant generalisations for yourself on such a paper, the better your paper will be considered (assuming that it is well written, etc.). It is important to understand here that although you may be able to get all the data you need for such a paper from a grammar of the language, even at your beginning level, you are likely to be able to improve on the discussion in a traditional grammar book in terms of making significant generalisations. To give a simple example, you are likely to read in an introductory German textbook that at the end of words, /d/ is pronounced like [t], /b/ is pronounced like [p], and /g/ is pronounced as [k]. As a linguistics student, you should already be able to make a simple generalisation instead: a stop becomes voiceless at the end of a word, improving on the expert’s book from a linguistic point of view! The information presented in the grammar book is quite correct, but it does not express a simple generalisation about German phonology. If your paper on this topic is well-written and uses appropriate references but does not show much creativity in the area of data-gathering and discernment of significant generalisations, it is unlikely to attract a mark higher than a Credit.
The other type of paper involves reading about and summarising arguments about linguistic matters. A good paper of this sort investigates some important area in our knowledge of human language and demonstrates that you understand the issues and the major points of view on those issues. Note that you do not necessarily have to adopt a point of view and defend it in your paper. Your paper is a research paper and the main point is to show that you have learned something about an area of linguistics. However, to get a really high mark with a topic of this sort, you will need to show that you have read your sources critically, not simply reporting what different people have said. It is important to show critical thinking—not everything that appears in print makes sense! A paper of this sort will need to draw on more references than the more empirical type of paper; ten would normally be a reasonable number, but that will depend on the topic and availability of sources. If your paper on this sort of topic uses appropriate references, is well-written and shows a good understanding of what has been read, but does not show a good grasp of the important issues or the application of critical thinking, it is unlikely to attract a mark higher than a Credit.